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Published Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday

7 January 2000

Issue # 121

Kingfisher aims for February Launch

The Open 60 Kingfisher being built for Ellen Macarthur to sail in this year's Vendee Globe is nearing completion.  Kingfisher will swim for the first time 17 February in the America's Cup basin.  After that she will be thoroughly tested via a delivery trip through the Southern Ocean to England.

Design features of Kingfisher are as follows:

  • Cambered deck for stability if inverted

  • Traditionally rigged 3 spreader rig with spreaders swept back

  • Swing keel with asymmetrical dagger boards

  • North 3DL Sails

  • Yanmar Engine

  • Fredrickson and Spinlock deck hardware

  • Harken winches including a pedestal system

Needless to say the entire Kingfisher build and design team has been right busy. However, over Christmas Ellen Macarthur was able to take some time away.  As the saying goes she went 'walkabout'.  


Photos courtesy of Kingfisher Challenges


Tornado Australian Championships

The last day of this regatta was sailed in boisterous 18-22 knots winds.  This kept the fleet of catamarans in Sydney harbor rather than heading out to the ocean.

Both races were won by the team of Mitch Booth and Herbert Dercksen sailing for the Netherlands.  Booth formerly sailed for Australia.

The Netherlands team dominated the final race winning by over 4 minutes.  The Australian team of Bundock/Forbes had a 3 point lead going into this race.  However, the dominant performance of the Netherlands team clinched a regatta victory.

The fleet will remain in Sydney and contest the class World Championships.


Flight 5 is close formation racing

For complete results and standings see (C)update Daily.

Two exceptionally close races were sailed.  A way to emphasize the closeness of the races is to conduct a 'delta analysis'.

The biggest lead of the day was by America One, 29 seconds at the 3rd windward mark.  The smallest was by America One 7 seconds at the first windward mark.

The biggest gain was by Prada picking up 37 seconds on the final windward leg.  The total difference was 37 seconds as Prada went from 12 seconds down to 37 seconds ahead.

Average time difference was 13.9 seconds in the America One/Nippon race vs. 14 seconds in the France/Prada contest.

The mantra for this America's Cup has become it's a sailors regatta.    Consider that  the America's Cup boats are not one design.  Further the Cup has a history of break through designs making for blowout deltas.  

This is not the case this Cup. Consider that  80 foot boats from different design boards are separated by seconds and Tornado Catamarans are separated by minutes.  Let's amend the mantra to it's an extremely close sailors regatta.