Links to Torresen.com Home Page: Sailing New Service: Sailing Daily Archives: Sign Up Form
__________________________________________________________________________

Sailing Daily NewsPage
Sailing
North
East
West
South

Published Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday

25 February 2000

Issue # 151

By Ike Stephenson

Sailing 
News
Service
Nav
Station

  Torresen Sailing Site
S
a
i
l
i
n
g

ATWOS

N
e
w
s
S
e
r
v
i
c
e

Sailing Daily

Sailing Records

Sign Up Form

SD Back Issues

Control Menu

 Today's Sailing News 

(C)update: Race 3 Part Duex

If the reason that the first attempt at race 3 was lack of steady wind, the problem for attempt 2 could be lack of wind.

Forecasts call for SW winds of 10-15 knots declining to 5 knots from the SE by evening.  With New Zealand's north island being influenced by high pressure unsailable light winds will not be a surprise.

The high pressure has kept winds under 15 knots in the waters surrounding New Zealand. 

A glimmer of hope is seen in the weather observations at Auckland's airport.  For the last 15 hours observations at this location have shown winds of 15 knots or above from the south west.  Still, as of this writing it's 10 hours to start time so much can change.

With the seeming reluctance of the race committee to start a race in less than ideal conditions tonite could be another no race scenario.

If the racing gets off Prada needs a win or they'll be down 3-0.  

Team Adventure to Antarctica

While Team Adventure's Ollier designed catamaran is built in France other members of the team are on an expedition to Antarctica.  They will sail in these waters again during The Race.

Their voyage is from Cape Horn across Drake Passage.  After this 500 mile sail in 6-20 foot waves they headed for Boyd Straits in the South Shetland Islands.  

Sailing in this area is made difficult by inaccurate charting and the fact that GPS signals are dithered by the government.  

Once in the South Shetlands Pelagic sailed 120 miles further to land a crew to climb Cape Rendard.

Cape Renard can be best described as a double spired rock monolith 2400 feet in height.

To land near Cape Rendard is a dicey situation.  The first attempt was called off after a large sea swell made the landing too risky. The ledge that was the landing point was overwhelmed by the sudden increase in swell.  A dinghy from Pelagic took the climbing team off.  

Looking at the globe a certain way can make an around the world race look like a race around Antarctica.  Certainly the experience that Team Adventure members are attaining will be helpful during The Race.

 

 

 

 

Sailing Daily
Suggestion
Box

Illustrated Sail Trim and Rig Tuning:  Learn how to ride the wind faster

 

 

 

A Pocket Classic version of Slocum's Sailing Alone Around the World

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Team Adventure Web Site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

National Geographic Map Machine: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

E-Mail Sailing Daily
Suggestion
Box links &
articles

 

Help

Privacy Expectations

Employment