Return to the Torresen Marine Home Page
« News Home

Archive for October, 2008

US Sailing 2009 Rolex Miami OCR

Thursday, October 30th, 2008

Miami, Florida – US SAILING’s Rolex Miami OCR is preparing for its 2009 debut as the second stop on the inaugural International Sailing Federation’s (ISAF) Sailing World Cup 2008-2009 circuit. Already a long-time ISAF Grade 1 world ranking event as well as a US SAILING Team AlphaGraphics qualifier and preferred winter training regatta for the world’s elite Olympic and Paralympic hopefuls, the Rolex Miami OCR also will celebrate its 20th Anniversary when it returns to Coconut Grove, Fla., from January 25-31, 2009. The Notice of Race is now available online at the newly-launched event web site, www.RolexMiamiOCR.org. (more…)

Share or bookmark this story:
[Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]

Avoid Being Blown Away

Wednesday, October 29th, 2008

By Tom Rau, Senior Chief (ret), Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan
Author of The Boat Smart Chronicles

On Sunday, October 5, 2008 around 2 p.m. a 41-foot power boat exploded at the Oak Street Marina in South Haven, Michigan. The explosion illustrates the devastation boat fires can inflict not only to the boat itself but to nearby boats and those aboard.

I spoke with Captain Richard Lenardson of TowBoatU.S., a salvage and towing operation. Richard was nearby when the explosion rocked the marina. “I was around 30 boat docks away when I heard a thunderous explosion followed by a fireball and plume of black smoke,” said Richard. “I responded with my 23-foot tow boat. “When I arrived on scene the boat was engulfed in flames with black smoke boiling up from the inferno. The top cabin of the boat lay smoldering on a nearby grassy knoll. A secondary explosion sent debris through the hull of a boat in an adjacent slip.”

The fire had spread to boats in adjacent slips where fire consumed a boat’s mooring lines setting it free into the boat basin where it threatened nearby boats. Richard pushed the flaming boat back into its slip in reach of firefighters. At first, firefighters fought the blaze with water, with limited effect. A fire truck carrying foam soon arrived and joined the fight. “While pushing the burning boat back into the slip I could not see ahead with foam coating the windshield. Off to the side, I saw one of the victims climbing up a nearby dock ladder with the skin on his face peeled way,” said Richard.

The injured included two men, a woman, and child. All were recovered from the water by rescue personnel. Two of the adults were in critical condition. Fire Chief Ronald Wise of South Haven Area Emergency Services, suspects the boat owner and a friend were using a 28-gallon plastic gas container with an electric transfer pump to pump gas into the boat when the vessel exploded. Reportedly the electrical source for the pump was the boat’s batteries. That the cabin was blown off the boat along with the stern suggests that the source of the explosion occurred within the boat. The mishap remains under investigation.

Boat-Smart tips when fueling a boat:

· Open the engine hatches.
· Run the blower in the engine space and check the exhaust port on the side of boat with your palm to make sure its discharging air. During Coast Guard boat inspections I found a number of boats where the exhaust hose had separated from the discharge port. So, rather than discharging gas fumes through the exhaust port it was circulating them around the engine compartment.
· Deploy a sure gas fume detector- your nose. Open those engine hatches and give it a good sniff, especially after refueling a boat.
· Occasionally run a dry cloth over fuel lines especially near connecting points. Sniff the cloth for the odor of gasoline. This procedure is highly recommended after engine work involving gas-line joint connections.
· Michigan rules limit the size of plastic containers to five gallons for transportation of flammable liquid.

Boat Smart, keep it cool. Vent engine compartments before turning the ignition key.

By Tom Rau, Senior Chief (ret), Coast Guard Sector Lake Michigan
Author of The Boat Smart Chronicles

Share or bookmark this story:
[Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]

Conti Wins Rolex Osprey Cup

Wednesday, October 29th, 2008

St. Petersburg, Fla., USA – Italy’s Giulia Conti won the 2008 Rolex Osprey Cup – one of only two ISAF Grade 1 women’s match racing events in the U.S. – held at the St. Petersburg Yacht Club (St. Petersburg, Fla.), from October 22-25. Along with crew Alessandra Marenzi, Alessandra Angelini, Giovanna Micol, Conti (Toscolano Maderno, Italy) defeated Debbie Capozzi (Bayport, N.Y.) in the ‘first to win three’ final match format. A total of 78 matches were run by Principal Race Officer Pat Seidenspinner on Tampa Bay for the four-person teams sailing in Sonar class keelboats.
(more…)

Share or bookmark this story:
[Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]

Ericsson Racing Breaks 24 Hour Record Three Times Over

Wednesday, October 29th, 2008

STOCKHOLM, Sweden – Ericsson 4 has broken the 24-hour speed record set by ABN-AMRO 2 in the last Volvo Ocean Race, three times in the past twelve hours.
(more…)

Share or bookmark this story:
[Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]

Ericsson Holds Lead As Fleet Braces For Front

Monday, October 27th, 2008

STOCKHOLM, Sweden – Beginning what could be their final week at sea, Ericsson 4 continues to lead the fleet towards Cape Town, South Africa, and the Leg 1 finish of the Volvo Ocean Race.
(more…)

Share or bookmark this story:
[Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]

US SAILING’s Rolex Sailor of the Year Awards Update

Monday, October 27th, 2008

Portsmouth, R.I. – The end of the 2008 sailing season is approaching and, with that, comes the opportunity to recognize those U.S. sailors who have collected impressive regatta results at home and abroad in 2008. US SAILING is now accepting nominations for its Rolex Yachtsman and Yachtswoman of the Year awards, widely acknowledged as the foremost individual sailing honors in the nation. Through November 30, 2008, every member of US SAILING may nominate the one male and one female sailor they think has had the most outstanding on-the-water sailing performance during the 2008 calendar year. Nominations can be made online through the US SAILING website at www.ussailing.org/awards/rolex. (more…)

Share or bookmark this story:
[Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]

Rhode Island’s Tall Ship Oliver Hazard Perry Arrives in Newport

Monday, October 27th, 2008

NEWPORT, R.I. – The 132-foot hull of Rhode Island’s future Tall Ship Oliver Hazard Perry arrived in Newport today, after being towed 892 miles from its former home in Amherstburg, Ontario. The hull was bought by the non-profit organization Tall Ships Rhode Island (TSRI), Inc., on September 2, 2008, and will be berthed for the winter at Bowen’s Wharf, in Newport’s historic waterfront shopping district. (more…)

Share or bookmark this story:
[Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]

Steps To Prepare Your Engine’s Cooling System For Winter – Fresh Water Cooled Engines

Thursday, October 23rd, 2008

This is to give general guidelines for the winterization of inboard engines that have internal, heat exchanger type cooling systems. Variations will become evident for different brands of engines; the principals will be the same. Engines do not freeze. It is the water within the engine and peripherals that freezes and causes damage. To preclude freeze damage you must either eliminate the water or make it so that it will not freeze.Good steps to follow:

1) Check the specific gravity of the internal coolant. Antifreeze checkers are widely available, and very cheap. Depending upon your location, be assured that the freeze protection is adequate. If protection is marginal, either drain some off and add 100% new or change the whole lot. Antifreeze should be changed every three to five years, according to Yanmar and the AF makers.

2) Shut off the sea water intake seacock, if the boat is in the water.

3) Take the hose off the seacock and put it into a jug of environmentally friendly antifreeze. It is sometimes easier to remove the hose at the pump and use a different hose into the jug.

4) Start the engine and run it until the antifreeze comes out the exhaust.

5) Reinstall the hose to the seacock.

6) Reopen the seacock after the boat is hauled. If the boat is to be left in the water, the seacock may require winterizing, again depending on the severity of your winter.

If you are not located where winterizing is required read this through and purr.

It is highly recommended that if the lube oil needs to be changed that it be done prior to lay-up so that fresh oil is coating the innards of the engine. If fuel filters are in the plan do them first. Then start the engine to check the fuel filters and warm the engine to facilitate the oil change.

Share or bookmark this story:
[Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]

Clean Fuel

Thursday, October 23rd, 2008

One of the main contributors to reliability of an engine is the quality of the fuel. You must start off with a good fuel and then not let it get contaminated. Sometimes, but very seldom, the contamination comes with the fuel. Most all fuel dispensers have final filters on their pumps that will shut down the flow if dirty, or if water is trying to get by. The most common contamination is water.

It is virtually impossible to keep water out of the fuel tank. There is always the threat of condensation inside the tank where the moisture in air within the tank is precipitated on the sides of the tank with temperature variations. This can be overcome by not exposing the sides of the tank to the air by keeping them covered with diesel fuel. The usual way for water to get into the fuel tank is at the fill. All fill caps have an O ring to make a seal. If the O ring is defective, the fill becomes a small funnel. Each time it rains or each time the deck is washed, a drop or two of water enters the tank. Over time the accumulation is enough that the fuel pickup to the engine starts to get the water. This usually happens when motoring in a slop where the water forms waves under the fuel and the crests of these waves impinge upon the end of the pickup tube. You don’t know it’s happening until a filter shuts down or, with some filters, the water actually gets to the injectors.

Water in the fuel tank is often discovered when changing filters. If any water is present in any fuel filter, it indicates that there is water in the tank. Now is the time to take care of it. The water can be removed only by picking it off the bottom of the tank. Pumping out all the fuel through the normal pickup tube will not get the water. Many tanks have a hand hole in their tops that can be removed for access. Others have a fuel gauge sender that can be removed. A definite low spot in the tank must be located. If there is no true low spot, one can usually be made by heeling the boat. The water will have run to the low spot quickly. Now you must go in through the access with a pump tube that is stiff enough so that you can feel when it is in that lowest spot and pump out the water. If algae are present, it will take longer to move and all of it may not be pumped out. The filters will find it later if it exists.

There are also wick type devices that can be lowered into the tank that will absorb only water. These can be pulled out from time to time and checked. They get replaced when they are full of water. There are chemicals that can be smeared on the end of a stick and the stick can then be inserted to the bottom of the tank. The chemical changes color if there is water present.

Additives should not be required and, in my opinion, should not be used. If there is no water, no water dispersion medium is needed. If there is no water, there will not be any algae ergo algaecides are not required. Some additives react with others forming crystals. Not good. Some additives alter the combustibility of the fuel and can affect the running of the engine, especially when warm. Some additives kill algae but leave their poor dead bodies in the fuel. Other additives claim to disperse the water into the fuel, when this happens some algae go along for the ride with that water. I have not seen an additive that claims to remove the algae’s fecal matter. The refineries make good fuel that contains the proper lubricating qualities and life enhancing additives. That fuel is distributed to the service stations, truck stops and marinas in good condition. Most dispensers deliver it in good condition. Most contamination occurs with the final user. The final user must keep that fuel in good condition or take the proper steps to remove the contamination.

How does one define “old” fuel? Unless you have completely drained and cleaned your fuel tank, it is probably accurate to state that some of the original fuel is still there. How much it has been diluted (rejuvenated) by new fuel would depend on many variables. If you have a 30-gallon capacity and only use 15 gallons a year, you would cut the old fuel by 50% each year. Considering that many of the larger cruising sailboats have much larger tanks and some don’t burn much more fuel, there is a lot of old fuel that goes sailing. We have seen boats that were in storage for more than five years get launched, new batteries installed, and the engines started as if they had never been idle.

Share or bookmark this story:
[Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]

Steps To Prepare Your Engine’s Cooling System For Winter – Raw Water Cooled Engines

Thursday, October 23rd, 2008

This is to give general guidelines for the winterization of inboard engines that do not have internal heat exchanger type cooling systems. Variations will become evident in different brands of engines, however the principals will be the same. Engines do not freeze. It is the water within the engine and peripheral equipment that freezes and causes damage. To preclude freeze damage you must either eliminate the water or make it so that the water will not freeze.Good steps to follow:1) Shut off the cooling water seacock if the boat is still in the water2) Open the drains on the engine block and manifold – make sure that water comes out. There is sometimes blockage at the plughole of petcock. If a water heater is involved, it too must be drained.3) When the water has drained, close the drains.

4) Remove the hose from the seacock and put it in a jug of environmentally friendly antifreeze. If easier, replace the hose with another connection to the inlet side of the sea water pump.

5) Start the engine and run it until antifreeze comes out the exhaust. Most antifreeze will bypass the engine which doesn’t matter because it has been drained. A little will go into the engine that will take care of any water that ran down from the walls inside the engine.

6) When, or if, the boat is out of the water, open the seacock to drain water from it. If the boat is to stay in the water, the seacock must be treated to prevent freezing.

Running the engine to temperature to open the thermostat and then introducing antifreeze requires that the antifreeze be at the same temperature so that the thermostat does not close when contacted by something cool.

It is highly recommended that if the lube oil needs to be changed that it be done prior to lay-up so that fresh oil is coating the innards of the engine. If fuel filters are in the plan, do them first. Then start the engine to check the fuel filters and warm the engine to facilitate the oil change.

Share or bookmark this story:
[Digg] [Reddit] [del.icio.us] [Facebook] [Technorati] [Google] [StumbleUpon]